Tag Archives: normalise breastfeeding

The long road home.

So, we’re home! To be precise we got home at 22:40 on Sunday night, and since then it’s been a tiring blur of washing, tidying, shopping and play group this morning. Figured I’d give you a run down of our journey home today, and then shall do a rough overview of our holiday in another post. So, Sunday…

We’d set our alarms for 4am, with the aim of leaving the house by 5. The ferry wasn’t due to leave till 2pm, with boarding from 12:30, but with a 5 hour drive ahead of us we wanted to give ourselves an extra 2 hours for stops or traffic, and in the end it was a good decision. The family we were currently staying with, Kibas mum, her husband, 3 of Kibas sisters and one of his brothers, had all decided to get up to say goodbye so we attempted an earlyish night, which probably did not end up as early as we’d have hoped. 

I was rudely awoken at around 2am by a breeze coming from the previously closed window above my head. As I awoke I realised Kiba was standing there and as I asked what was up he replied with the short answer “I need to pee.” Ah. At his Mums to go to the loo at night meant going downstairs and getting through a room full of dogs that didn’t particularly like our night wandering, as we’d previously found out with many growls and barking, so I could see his predicament. I heard him attempt to get down only to retreat with the growls following him. After a bit more muttering and pacing he decided to pee out of the window, much to my amusement. It still makes me want to giggle thinking about it. 

4am came, and the final preparations were sorted. The goodbyes were hard and came with a lot of tears from Kibas mum and sisters, the hugs were long, no one wanting to let go. But 5am soon turned up and we set off, not long before the sun began to rise. I’ll admit that this time on the 5hr leg of our journey my tiredness got the better of me and I drifted in and out of sleep in between admiring the views, hoping it wouldn’t be too long before we were back. We took two stops along the way, first so Kiba could pee, and I could give Taya some milk, and the second as Taya was crying as she wanted to breastfeed again, and was getting quite upset. Luckily we’d allowed for extra time. 

We got close to the Hook of Holland before Kiba needed the toilet again, and we decided to get some food, so used my Google maps to find the closest McDonald’s. Now, if you haven’t driven over in Holland let me tell you now, the roads can be quite confusing! On a roundabout in most places you can go round and exit, in your lane, but if really need be you can change when safe to do so. In Holland you have one chance at choosing the right lane, as they are all separate, so we did go wrong a couple of times admittedly. Eventually we got to McDonald’s for around 11am, so we decided on an early lunch and quick play in their play area for the kids. By 12 we decided to head to the ferry. 

After checking in we surprisingly were allowed on straight away, no waiting about whatsoever. We were right near the front and this time remembered to take a photo of deck and coloured stairs so we wouldn’t forget. The only bad thing of boarding early meant we had a fair wait until setting sail, although even that was slightly early. We settled on the sun deck at first, after Taya had walked in to a post on the way there, (she has a tendency to not look where she is going) and Logan was thrilled that there was a ball available to play in the basketball/football cage. Taya was thrilled that she could open and shut the door of said cage. Taya then fell off the bench getting down off my lap, so wasn’t in the happiest of moods. We set sail and she wanted to breastfeed, so I ended up missing one of times I think is most exciting to watch overboard, leaving the port. It soon got quite windy and chilly, so we decided to venture inside and made our way to the playroom. I’m pretty sure Kiba had a good nap on the floor in there, Logan either played on his DS or watched the Curious George cartoons that they had on. Taya happily played. I chatted briefly on messenger and played with Taya. We stayed a good while before going for another wander, only to head back shortly for the children’s entertainment. 

This time it was an older gentleman called Adrian. He did a mix of magic, Punch & Judy (and the Dutch equivalent) and balloon modelling. He was a very interesting character who spoke his mind, knew his facts, and was very engaging with his audience. Logan once again managed to get picked, and came away with a pretty awesome balloon t-rex hat! Taya slept through the whole thing, she only fell asleep as she was hiding from Adrian, so it was worth going to see for both kids! 

We spent the rest of the trip in a space next to the stairs, as there were yet again no inside seats available. The kids thought this was great though as they could crawl under the stairs! They had fun chasing each other, looking through their books/magazines and playing with the playdoh grab bag I had bought them, and I also finally got Logan to write his postcards, better late than never! As we started to come in to port I took the kids for a walk on the sundeck, and let Logan have a quick kick about before heading to the play area, while waiting near the top of our stairs. Soon we were allowed down and we packed up in the car. It took forever to get off the ferry, for being nearly the first on we were left nearly till last to get off. And that’s where we began our wait. 45 minutes. It took 45 minutes to get through UK border control. Taya was miserable for most of it, and Logan fell asleep in that time! We were within the last 10 vehicles to leave the port. It was slightly ridiculous. 

Finally we were on the final stretch, less than 2 hours till home. We did stop off to grab a baguette and drink for Kiba and I. The kids had eaten all our snacks On-board the ferry, and we weren’t going to pay €5 for a sandwich! So we’d waited, and even though they weren’t the best, it was food and it was good. It gave us the final energy boost for the drive, before then I’d been struggling to stay awake again, but now I could keep Kiba company in the drive in to recognisable known territory. The light quickly faded, and we arrived home in the dark, just as we had left it. We got everything inside and it really didn’t take long before we all collapsed in to bed, deep sleeps all round.

Two days later and I still feel tired, and unorganised, but we’re slowly getting there, hopefully regular posts will also be back to normal soon. If you’ve got this far in yet another long post then thank you. 

A quick snap, I took a lot of photos, shall share some another time, so keep an eye out!

Let’s celebrate breastfeeding!

To start off, I don’t mean to offend anyone, everyones feeding story is different and that’s up to you. Both of mine have very different stories to tell. This post is merely to celebrate what I personally have achieved, as it should be. I respect everyones choices, but the fact that I feel the need to state I’m not bashing anyones choices shows just how judged everyone feels for making an informed choice. But anyway, let’s continue…

This week is National Breastfeeding Celebration Week, with this year focusing on support, so I couldn’t let the opportunity pass to share my experiences. One bad, one good. 

When I was pregnant with Logan I had already decided fairly early on that I would be breastfeeding, I mean, that’s the natural thing to do isn’t it? I didn’t know alanyone who did breastfeed, but read up about it. When I gave birth, which wasn’t the most straightforward birth, he didn’t want to latch, he much preferred to sleep. I ended up having a very helpful midwife show me how to hand express, collecting the small drops of colostrum in a syringe to give to him. Another midwife cane to help later and she was rather rough, trying to shove my breast in to logans mouth. Luckily he did soon decide to wake up enough to feed and I was over the moon. We were sent home, even though I’d said that it was a bit sore, with the not so comforting words of “it’ll be okay, just keep going”. I lost count of the times I got told this, no one seemed to offer any real advice. I then became quite poorly and had to visit the out of hours Dr, where it turns out I had an infection, they never decided in what, womb or urinary tract, but they gave me antibiotics and sent me on my way. I remember feeling absolutely rotten, stomach pains and hot sweats, mixed with the pain of feeding Logan was not pleasant. Everytime I held him he wanted to feed which made me not want to hold him. Which then made me feel guilty. I remember many an hour crying as I just didn’t know what to do, who to turn to. My partner nor Mum didn’t know what to do other than suggest formula, and I felt guilty for even considering it but just felt so, so terrible and no one had helped me up till then, so after another big old cry I agreed. I didn’t want to resent this tiny baby any longer, I wanted to enjoy him, cuddle him. So that’s where my journey ended, less than a week after it had begun. I admit, I still feel guilty about it at times, I wish I’d of seeked more and better help, and maybe persevered a bit more. Maybe it would have worked out? Maybe it would have ended the same. Who knows, but what I do know is that Logan is a happy kid who doesn’t remember or care about my decision!

When I became pregnant the second time I did even more research, know better, do better, and found as much support as possible, mostly online support groups, but I also made a friend who was breastfeeding. Before that point I don’t think I’d even seen breastfeeding in real life really, crazy to think, but true for a lot of people! Taya had an easy, uncomplicated birth, and although I had to go to theatre later on thanks to a stitching mishap (And yup, that’s as bad as it sounds!) we’d had the golden hour and she latched and fed like a pro. She continued to do well and despite being a tad jaundiced we got home with no problems. I did have the initial sharp pain after she latched, which honestly was toe-curling for a while, but I pushed on through, even having to hold my breath at times. As soon as I hit a week, passing the point I gave up with Logan, I felt a bit more relaxed. They say the first 6 weeks are the hardest and I don’t disagree. It may be natural and what your breasts are for, but that doesn’t mean it is easy, it truly is 90% determination and 10% milk production. Taya was thriving on my milk though, and as the weeks passed it got easier and easier, the initial latch pain eased about 5 weeks in. I did have a very powerful let down, which honestly hurt at times, but again I just kept on going. I kept on going through every developmental leap, niplash, teething, sensitivity and being touched out. I reached out for support when I needed it, but generally I think I’ve had it pretty easy. We are now nearly at the 2 year mark, with no signs of stopping just yet! I couldn’t be more proud of myself. 

I would strongly recommend anyone to at least try breastfeeding. Do your research. It is what is best for your baby, and nothing can quite compare. If you’re struggling, with anything, reach out, there is now tons of support out there. Then if things don’t work out, don’t feel guilty, you’ve tried, that’s what counts. I think the key thing to successful breastfeeding is support, and that’s why I’d like to eventually train as a peer supporter, to help others on their journey.

I don’t have too many photos of me feeding, as I personally like to be discreet with people I don’t know, but I do have a few! For those who think it can’t be done discreetly, I beg you to argue with me that you know I’m feeding in all these photos! Feel free to tell me your breastfeeding stories, or share photos, let’s normalise breastfeeding!